animal lover through and through

Today, as I was sitting at this kid’s house, a slow moving black cat walked under my legs and away from me. The kid’s response?

“Just kick it out of your way.”

My reply?

“Kick it!? I wanna pet it!”

This is when I realized there are two different kind of people in this world: animal lovers and animal non-lovers. I am, by far, and animal lover. If an animal of any kid is in the room I want to be holding it, petting it, watching it, or even taking pictures of it. I want to be giving it a voice by narrating all the silly little behaviors animals have.

A few minutes after the cat walked under my legs, I could hear it meowing at the bottom of the stairs. After a few solid meows, I look towards the stairs and said, “What are you trying to tell me, little guy?” The kid said that the cat was just angry it couldn’t get downstairs because the door was shut. He then went on to explain how annoying he thinks this cat is because all it does is whine and complain and meow all day as he’s trying to nap on the couch.

This is when I realized that I give animals just as much personality as babies and other humans. I think they try to communicate with us, I think they enjoy communicating with us, and I also love to try and communicate with them. We are speaking completely different languages, yet dogs know how to sit, come, lay down, and dance. Cats are a little less trainable, but they still have a crazy amount of personality.

I don’t understand how people don’t have compassion for animals because I can’t help but want to snuggle up against them and steal some of their furry warmth whenever I’m close enough. It’s not my fault I have a huge heart and an open soul.

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4 thoughts on “animal lover through and through

  1. Cats do communicate, but not in the same way. They watch us and they understand what it means when we move our bodies–and not just when we move our bodies in an intentional communication. I’m sometimes really surprised by the seamless communication my cat and I have–we’ve been living together for nearly 16 years. I find myself playing with her exactly when she wants to play even though at her age all she does is walk across the room in a certain way. And she knows when I’ve given it up and am finally ready to wake up in the morning or after a nap. I find myself lifting the blanket when she’s cold and wants to sleep under the covers. The cat in your post meows because the kid he lives with is a lot less smart than I am–but she knows that annoyance works. Mine hardly makes any noise at all.

    • I couldn’t agree more. Although I haven’t been living with my cats for nearly as long, I’ve already developed a sense of their physical language. I can predict behaviors from both of the cats I live with and, like you, know just how to play with each of them (because they don’t play the same way).
      And about the cat from the post…I believe the meows were a cry from starving for some attention, poor thing!

  2. When I was really, really small, we got a kitten. We named him Flanel. For some strange reason, that nobody ever truly understood, Flanel became ‘my cat’. He followed me around, waited for me at the doorstep when I came home from school, and slept at my feet or curled in a ball against my belly in winter. There wasn’t an ounce of viciousness in this cat. He knew my mood before I did. Sadly, he passed away, but I will never forget what he taught me. He taught me to love animals. He taught me that, no matter how clumsy and short sighted I was, he would love me and keep me warm. I put him through so much! As a toddler, I put him in a doll buggy and walked around with him in the yard; he would just nap, like the amazing, tolerant cat he was. I’d put doll clothes on him, but he would just sit there and watch me as I played. Everyone who visited us, was amazed by the strange relationship that existed between that big grey cat and that little giggling girl. Cats are amazing!

    • Haha! It’s always nice to hear stories from fellow cat lovers that reassure my beliefs that animals can teach people important lessons if we just take the time to try and figure them out. Thanks for sharing!

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